Full-Board-Vision Chess Puzzle: White Checkmates in Two

Do you keep the full board in line of your vision throughout the game? What’s your endgame vision like? The world’s best Grandmasters seldom lose sight of any of the squares during any phase of the game. It’s natural chess training for them. White plays and checkmates in two in the position on the left. Keep a large view of the chess board before you and you would be able to calculate the solution well. Read more…

Quick Chess Puzzle: White Checkmates in Two

A snappy two-move checkmate. Can you win for White? Read more…

Turning-the-Tables Chess Puzzle: How can White Win?

Hold your nerves for White today. Black needs just one move to checkmate. Can White really turn the tables and win? The position is from Nenaschew-Muchametow, Nowosibirsk, 1989. Read more…

New Chess Killer Tips Free Video Podcast #069

Here’s the latest Chess Killer Tips Free Video Podcast #069. Computer Chess Guru Steve Lopez from Chess King shows us a nice position from the game Prince – Sklyarov, Thailand Chess Open. Black plays and wins. Middle Game. Easy. Only 4 minutes. Read more…

Idea-is-Everything Chess Puzzle: Find the Win for White

What is that chess magic that pulls out wins even from balanced-material endgames? It’s all about remembering the right patterns and ideas. Plus, it’s all about assessing where the opponent’s weak spots are. White to play and win in the position on the left. Hint: Is the Black King too busy? Read more…

Release-Rex Chess Puzzle by Adolf Krämer, 1922

We spotted this nice chess puzzle in Leonard Barden’s chess column in The Guardian this weekend. The column was about some interesting aspects of the new format at the Aeroflot Chess Tournament this year. Which reminds us: Did you read ‘Chess Queen Kosteniuk Top Woman at Super Strong Aeroflot Blitz Tournament’? Back to the puzzle. White plays and checkmates in two (by Adolf Krämer, 1922). A ‘Release Rex’ puzzle where White’s first move must grant the king an escape square. Read more…

Endgame-Technique Chess Puzzle: Can White Escape with Draw?

How well do you remember your chess endgame technique? White is material down, but can White escape with a draw? Read more…

Alert Chess Puzzle: Can White Win?

Here’s an interesting position from the game Stahlberg-Becker, Buenos Aires, 1964. The material balance is obvious, but the killer checkmate is not. So, how does White play this position for a win? Happy solving. Read more…

Killer Chess Move: White Pins, Wins

The killer chess move for White doesn’t strike you immediately, but White has a forced win despite being a full Bishop down. This position is from the game Schumov-Winawer, 1875. Improve your chess with Chess King software and DVDs. You will be surprised at how easy chess can be with Chess King. Read more…

Sniffing-a-Win Chess Puzzle: Where’s the Checkmate?

This balanced position came up on the board in the game Schuh-Beda, Groningen, 1991. White was considering all types of sacrifices on h7 for a forced win. Was that correct? What do you think White should play for a forced win? You can sniff “something” is in the air for sure… is it a checkmate? Read more…

Winning Chess Combination: What’s White’s Best Move?

Today’s chess class is about a nice middlegame combination from the game Rubinstein-Hirschbein. Not only is Black behind on development, but they have also lost the fianchetto Bishop. What could be White’s winning combination? Hint: We are talking of more than just winning the exchange. Think about it. Happy solving. The answer is in the Chess King applet in the extended post. Read more…

Clever Chess Pin: What’s White’s Winning Idea?

A delightful position from the game Rosenblatt-Wolk, Biel, 1977. Do you think White can win this position or just balance the material and settle for draw? Read more…

Threat-is-Enough Chess Puzzle: How Does White Win?

This is an interesting position from the game Pissarski – Markuschew, 1983. There is no immediate checkmate visible, but White has a magic move that is based on a checkmate threat and secures the win based on material. Can you see White’s magic move or winning idea? Read more…

Difficult Chess Class: Karpov – Unzicker 1-0

This is a chess strategy master class of level difficult from the middle game. Anatoly Karpov gives Unzicker a lesson in strategy of particularly high level. Find the best strategic plan for white. Watch the solution with the #1 Chess Killer Tips podcast (www.chesskillertips.com) hosted by Chess Queen™ Alexandra Kosteniuk. Read more…

Sharp-Eye Chess Puzzle: White Checkmates in Two

Here is a complicated position from the game Meszarcos – Oltean, Budapest, 1991. However, White has a nice checkmate in two lined up. Can you see it quickly? Read more…

Alert Chess Puzzle: What’s White’s Strongest Move?

Simple winning combination on the board there for White in a game between Najdorf – Timman, Buenos Aires, 1980. How can White win this? Read more…

Strong Chess Puzzle: Kasparov – Browne 1-0

This position is taken from the game Kasparov – Browne, 1979. How did White win this? Read more…

Difficult Chess Puzzle: Robert Fontaine – Maxime Vachier-Lagrave 1-0

Here’s a difficult chess puzzle from Robert Fontaine – Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Aix-les-Bains 2007. Black plays and mates in 7 moves (How difficult can that be – wink). The puzzle comes to you from our award-winning chess puzzle database www.chesskillertips.com and is presented by Guest Star Almira Skripchenko. Read more…

Killer Chess Idea: Find White’s Winning Move in a Minute

This position came up in the game Below-Ohngemach, Narva, 1984. White has a beautiful killer move that can win the game. Can you find it quickly… say, within a minute? Read more…

Deadly Chess Attack: How Does White Win?

This is an interesting middlegame position from Aljechin-Ricondo, Santander, 1945. Black’s King is under serious threat. Can you figure out White’s deadly attack? Read more…