“I did not expect that I would manage to win and now I am very, very happy. I am so pleased that I have managed to level the scores, that for the moment I am not thinking about tomorrow’s tie-break. I will think about it later.” – World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand remarked thus after winning the sixth game at the Lausanne, Switzerland World Chess Championship, 1998 when playing against Russia’s Anatoly Karpov – the 12th World Chess Champion. Anand went on to lose the tiebreak to Karpov. Anand had just lost the fourth game against Karpov and drawn the fifth a day earlier. The match would have been over had Anand lost this sixth game. However, Anand took the match to the tiebreak by winning and drawing the match score level 3-3. Anand had earned the right to challenge Karpov by winning a 100-player knockout tournament consisting of short 2 game matches, using blitz games as tiebreakers. The winner of this tournament would (after three days rest) play Karpov for the title in a 6 game mini-match. The tournament was held in Groningen, Netherlands in December, 1997. Anand, Kasparov’s opponent in the 1995 PCA championship, beat Nikolic, Khalifman, Almasi, Shirov, Gelfand, and Adams on his way to playing Karpov. At that time, many had said, he never got the rest he needed before the world title clash.


Anand Viswanathan (IND) (2795) – Karpov Anatoly (RUS) (2725)

Result: 1-0
Site: Lausanne (Switzerland)
Date: 1998
[…] 1.d4 ¤f6 2.¥g5 e6 3.e4 h6 4.¥xf6 £xf6 5.¤c3 d6 6.£d2 g5 7.¥c4!? N
(7.O-O-O a6 8.g3 ¤d7 9.f4 ¥g7 10.¤h3 £e7 11.¢b1 b5 12.¥g2 ¥b7 13.e5 O-O-O Unclear Hodgson – Razuvaev, Slough 1997)
7…¤c6 8.¤ge2 ¥g7 9.¦d1 ¥d7 10.O-O O-O-O 11.¤b5!? With the idea d5! 11…a6 12.¤a3 g4 (12…£g6 13.b4!? £xe4 14.b5 axb5 15.¤xb5 With attack) 13.f4! (13.b4 £g5! Unclear) 13…gxf3 14.¦xf3 £e7 15.c3 h5 16.¦df1 ¦df8 17.b4 ¤a7 18.¤c2 ¥h6 19.£e1 ¢b8 20.¥d3 ¥c6 21.¤f4 ¦fg8 22.d5!? ¥e8 23.£f2 ¥g7 24.¤d4 ¥d7 25.dxe6 ¥xd4! 26.cxd4 fxe6 27.e5!? (27.a3 ¤c6 28.¤e2 ¥e8 29.¦f6 Unclear) 27…¥c6! 28.¤g6 £d8?
(28…¦xg6! 29.¥xg6 (29.¦f8+? ¦xf8 30.£xf8+ ¤c8 31.¥xg6 £g5µ) 29…¥xf3 30.£xf3 dxe5 31.dxe5 £xb4 32.£f6 £d4+ 33.¢h1 ¦d8 34.¥xh5 ¤c6 35.£xe6 ¤xe5 Unclear)
29.¤xh8 ¥xf3 30.¤f7! £h4 (30…¥xg2 31.¤xd8 ¥e4+ 32.£g3 ¦xg3+ 33.hxg3 ¥xd3 34.¦f8ќ) 31.£xf3ќ (31.£xh4? ¦xg2+ 32.¢h1 ¦f2+=) 31…£xd4+ 32.¢h1 d5 33.¦d1! £xb4 34.¦b1 £a4 35.£xh5 ¤c6 36.£e2 ¢a7 37.£f2+ b6 38.¦c1 ¢b7 39.h3 ¦c8 40.£f6 ¤d4 41.¤d8+ ¢b8 42.¤xe6 [ K. KODINETS ] 42……
(42…¤xe6 43.£xe6 £a3 44.¦d1 c6 45.£d6+ £xd6 46.exd6 ¦d8 47.h4 ¦xd6 48.g4 ¦h6 49.h5 ¢c7 50.¥xa6 b5 51.¢g2 ¦h8 52.¢f3 ¢d6 (0:00:09) 42.N8xe6)
(42…£a3 43.¦xc7 ¦xc7 44.£d8+ ¦c8 45.£xb6+ ¢a8 46.£xd4 £xa2 47.¤f4 £a3 48.e6 £d6 49.g4 a5 50.g5 £b4 51.£xb4 axb4 52.¤xd5 ¢b7 53.¤xb4 ¢c7 54.¢g2 ¢d6 55.¥e2 (0:00:11) 42.N8xe6 (0:00:14))
Deja vu? Maybe, this quote by the World Chess Champion reminds you of Game 8 of the World Chess Championship 2012 between Viswanathan Anand and Boris Gelfand of Israel! You can replay that game at this Chess King post. 😉