Sunday Chess Puzzle: Peter Svidler vs Alexander Chekaev 1-0

GM Peter Svidler is the Russian nomination for the Khanty-Mansiysk Chess Candidates 2014. He has also won the Russian national chess title for a record seven times. Here’s revisiting an old chess game of Peter Svidler. Read more…

Euro Chess Club Cup 2013: Peter Svidler – Ioannis Papaioannou 1-0

Here is a great game by the recently-crowned Russian Chess Champion Peter Svidler at the European Club Chess Championships 2013 in Greece. Read more…

Thessaloniki Chess Grand Prix 2013 Round 6: Gata Kamsky – Peter Svidler 1-0

Gata Kamsky avoided theoretical discussion and started calmly with the English opening. In reply, Svidler set the reversed Sicilian Dragon. The play developed slowly with lots of maneuvering, but White attained better pawn structure. Black decided not to wait too long and started operating on the kingside. However, the position opened to white’s benefit. The game still remained very complicated and Kamsky was not sure by how much he was better until he played 42.Rh2. Already after the next move Svidler resigned. Read a report on the round at Chess Blog. Read more…

Thessaloniki Chess Grand Prix 2013 Round 4: Leinier Dominguez Perez – Peter Svidler 1-0

The game started as Ruy Lopez and white chose the quiet but popular 6.d3. Later on, both went for an attack on opposing flanks. Dominguez managed to “trick” his opponent into giving up the a-file. Dominguez said that 23…d5 was a mistake, he expected 23…Rxc2. After this the black position was already difficult. Dominguez said in the press conference that he made a good opening choice, because he managed to create some pressure thanks to the pawn structure. You can read a report on the complete round at Chess Blog. Read more…

Thessaloniki Chess Grand Prix 2013 Round 2: Alexander Morozevich – Peter Svidler 1-0

The match started as a Four Knights Game and Svidler opted for the active Rubinstein variation. Black sacrifices a pawn but gets good compensation as white pieces are a little bit clumsy. Black challenged white’s foremost pawn on e5, but Morozevich didn’t want to dig in with 13.Bc2 and 14.f4, but instead went for the inspiring b4-b5 advance. Later, we learned from Morozevich that this was his attempt to activate the pieces on the Queenside. Read more…

Thessaloniki Chess Grand Prix 2013 Round 1: Peter Svidler – Etienne Bacrot 1-0

Peter Svidler was the first to score a victory in Thessaloniki. His game with Etienne Bacrot started as Semi-Tarrasch and for awhile it looked like black is doing fine. But later he started to err and Svidler used the opportunity to invade the seventh rank with the rooks. Bacrot admitted that he “lost control some time around 19…h6.”. Svidler pointed that 21…Ba3 was unnecessary and that 21…Rc8 was to be preferred. He also criticized the retreat on 22nd move and suggested 22…Qa5 as possible improvement. Read more…

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 3: Peter Svidler – Levon Aronian 1/2-1/2

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 3: The Peter Svidler – Levon Aronian draw was an interesting battle. At move 17, Aronian declined a pawn sac that actually gave White a Queenside majority plus an isolated pawn. White controlling the b-file still looked slightly better when playing a5 and offering a draw on his first legal occasion at move 31. Nothing much could be done by either side and the game ended peacefully. Read a report on the round at Chess Blog. Read more…

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 2: Wang Hao – Peter Svidler 1-0

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 2: Wang Hao used his space advantage and home preparation well to cash in on Black’s plans. The endgame with Rook, Knight and four pawns versus Rook, Bishop and three pawns was too tough for Svidler to defend. Eventually, the Chinese Grandmaster took home the point. Read a report on the Round at Chess Blog. Read more…

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 1: Peter Svidler – Jon Ludvig Hammer 1-0

Norway Chess Super Tournament 2013 Round 1: Seeded more than 100 points below the ninth rated player in this field, Jon Ludvig Hammer put up a strong fight against Peter Svidler in a Grünfeld exchange line. Without the queens white kept a slight queenside initiative, but black defended creatively when sacrificing a pawn on b6 to win back another pawn on e4. But, Svidler used his opportunities and ground down the Norwegian to begin the tournament with a win. Read a full report on the round at Chess Blog. Read more…

Alekhine Chess Memorial 2013 R5: Peter Svidler – Maxime Vachier-Lagrave

Alekhine Chess Memorial 2013 Round 5: French Grandmaster Maxime Vachier-Lagrave has concluded the Paris leg of the super tournament with a sole-lead performance. This nice win over Russia’s Peter Svidler, Vachier-Lagrave heads to St Petersburg – for the second leg of the tournament – with a cool half-point lead over the rest of the field. Read a full report on the round at Chess Blog. Replay the game with Chess King below. This tough game is an endgame class. Read more…

Alekhine Chess Memorial 2013 R4: Levon Aronian – Peter Svidler 1-0

World’s number 3 Levon Aronian picked up his second win in the event during the fourth round. That’s quite a comeback considering Aronian began the tournament with a loss in the first round. He beat Vladimir Kramnik in the second and drew with Viswanathan Anand in the third round. Aronian was all ready for Svidler’s Gruenfeld and played precisely to force Svidler to resign. Replay the game with Chess King. Read more…

Alekhine Chess Memorial 2013 R2: Michael Adams – Peter Svidler 1-0

The Alekhine Chess Memorial had another set of very exciting games in the second round. Former British Chess Champion Michael Adams won his second game straight to take lead in the tournament. Read a full round report on Chess Blog. Here is the nice Michael Adams – Peter Svidler game in the Chess King applet. Read more…

Fide Chess Candidates 2013 R14: Magnus Carlsen – Peter Svidler 0-1

World No. 1 Magnus Carlen had not lost a game since September, 2012. What were the chances that he would lose two games with White within a span of three rounds? That “statistically almost-impossible” event happened in the last round (14th) of the Fide Chess Candidates 2013 in London on Monday. Magnus Carlsen got into time trouble, botched a seemingly balanced position and Peter Svidler kept his cool to take home a fine victory. Earlier, Carlsen had lost his game with White to Vassily Ivanchuk in the 12th round. Read a full report in Chess Blog and replay the game with Chess King. Read more…

Fide Candidates 2013 R6: Peter Svidler-Magnus Carlsen 0-1

Six-time Russian champion Peter Svidler pulled the self-destruct switch with a doomed d3-pawn weakness and went down fighting to World No. 1 Norwegian Magnus Carlsen in Round 6 at the Fide Chess Candidates in London 2013. Here is the nice game that you can replay with Chess King. A full report on all the games of the round and the tournament is up at Chess Blog. Read more…

Fide Chess Candidates 2013 R3: Peter Svidler-Teimour Radjabov 1-0

London Chess Candidates Round 3: Teimour Radjabov’s overnight victory story ran into Peter Svidler’s bulldozer and the Azeri GM suffered a painful defeat in the third round with Black. The King’s Indian game with a gambit twist witnessed that saw the Russian Grandmaster consolidate easily and head for a win piece-up. Read a full round 3 report on Chess Blog. Replay the game in the extended post with Chess King. Read more…

Tashkent Chess Grand Prix Peter Svidler-Alexander Morozevich: Even Draw Can be Exciting!

This game was played at the recently-concluded Tashkent Chess Grand Prix between Peter Svidler and Alexander Morozevich. Peter Svidler tweeted about it: “At least finally there was something to watch on my board. Games vs Alexander Morozevich tend to get watchable at some point, as a rule”. Indeed, it is a spectacular draw. Watch the game in the Chess King applet. Have you started your own training with Chess King yet? Read the event report at Chess Blog. Read more…

Russian Chess: Spot Win Vitiugov Misses Against Svidler

How can Black win this?

Despite computers becoming the strongest chess players on the planet and despite top-level chess impossible without computer-aided chess training, the human element in chess tournaments would never go away. Best of grandmasters miss the easiest of wins. Here is an interesting position from the Russian Chess Superfinal 2012. Nikita Vitiugov missed a winning line with 26. …Qa5 27.b4 Qxb5. We pick up the game if the winning line were played. Look at the position on the left and can you spot the pretty mate that happens if White plays 28.QxQ? This game of Round 8 eventually ended in a draw. Read more…

World Rapid Chess: Karjakin’s Finesse for Win Against Svidler

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The World Rapid Chess Championship 2012 that was held in Astana, Kazakhstan saw a strong performance by Russia’s Sergey Karjakin to win the title ahead of some of the world’s strongest grandmasters. An important game that allowed Karjakin to get ahead of Magnus Carlsen was the won against Peter Svidler on the final day. Going for a simple combination, Karjakin first wins a pawn and then builds on the small advantage. Read more…

Čez Chess Trophy: Svidler vs Navara 1-0 Thanks to Passive Rook

The traditional Čez Chess Trophy is being held in Prague with David Navara facing Peter Svidler – the Russian grandmaster and World Cup 2011 winner. Every year Czech Republic’s strongest grandmaster David Navara gets the opportunity to gain more experience by playing a match against a world class player. Former opponents include Vassily Ivanchuk, Vladimir Kramnik and Judit Polgar, and this year Navara faces the winner of the World Cup 2011 and 6-times Russian champion Peter Svidler. The duo drew their first game, but Navara lost to Svidler thanks (rather no thanks) to a passive rook. Check out the chess game. Read more…